Author Topic: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources  (Read 6923 times)

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« Last Edit: September 06, 2008, 04:22:14 PM by EO »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2008, 02:26:19 AM »
Overview of the Church of Hala

Quote
Hala (Ha-la)

Symbol: A ring formed by thirteen serpents, each devouring the tail of the one before it.

Alignment: TN.

Domains: Healing, Magic, Plant, Weave. The Weave domain is unique to Halites; see the Appendix of the Ravenloft Gazetteer V for details.

Favored Weapon: Dagger.

Quote from: Ravenloft Campaign Setting
According to Hala's holy text, Tales of the Ages, nine gods created the world from the roiling mists of Chaos. The gods then withdrew, intending to allow mortals to fill their world with acts both good and evil. But the mortals lacked wisdom, and the world was soon filled with pain and anguish.

Just one of the Nine Gods, the goddess Hala, returned to the world to ease its suffering. She gathered together thirteen women and thirteen men and taught them the secrets of the Weave, an ancient form of magic. Unfortunately, this brand of magic is also known as witchcraft and provokes widespread, superstitious fear. Witchcraft's wretched reputation is largely due to hags, the most infamous practitioners. Although witchcraft is not inherently evil, it is thought to be rife with occult dangers. Exposure to witchcraft is thought to create Calibans, and according to folklore, witches who lose control of their magic may be permanently transformed into monstrous hags.

The Church of Hala is a secretive and highly mystical faith. Her clerics — who call themselves witches — operate a number of hospices scattered throughout Ravenloft where they offer rest and healing to anyone who comes to their door. The church does not actively seek new followers, however, and nowhere is the Church of Hala the predominant religion.

Hala's witches often face hostility when beyond the doors of their hospices. Any witch of Hala unwise enough to encounter the inquisitors of Tepest, for example, should count herself lucky to escape with her life.

Quote from: various sources
The Church of Hala

The most noble goals in life are to ease the suffering of the sick, to empower the weak and downtrodden, and to help those in need. These goals are primarly pursued through the hospices that can be found in virtually every domain. The Church of Hala does not actively proselytize its religion, and the hospices are always open to anyone in need. If someone expresses an interest in learning more about Hala, priests are always happy to talk about their goddess, but they do not do so uninvited. Generally speaking, the Church of Hala is of neutral alignment.

Membership
Hospices are isolated throughout the Core and there is no overarching structure governing them. These temples are formed of either female or male priests of Hala who call themselves witches and warlocks. Since the Church does not actively proselytize its religion, it has only a marginal following, but because of that unobstrusive presence, it is tolerated nearly everywhere in the Core with a few exceptions such as Tepest. Little is known about the rituals of the Church of Hala or the way 'Covens' form and one is brought into a Coven.

Recognition
Priestesses of Hala tend to wear simple robes and veils, while priests wear robes with large hoods. The color of the robes vary depending on the order, but they are mostly white or powder blue. Priests do not typically carry weapons, although they might or rare occasions if part of an adventuring party.

The only known consistency throughout the Core is that all priestesses wear woven clothing items to acknowledge their respect for Hala's Weave. This custom is more obvious in lands where Hala's priestesses are generally accepted - the Mordentish and Falkovnian adherents cover themselves completely in cloth, even wearing veils and considering it sacrilege to reveal themselves. In places such as Tepest, a priestess is likely just to warm herself with a simple, woolen shawl over her shoulders. Priests similarly wear woven clothes, although I have the distinct impression that the doctrinal requirements for such garments are less stringent for men, growing from the fact that Hala is female and women must emulate her more closely.

Activities
The most fundamental belief of priestesses and priests is that they are charged by Hala herself to ease pain and suffering in the land. They believe they have been given access to the most basic elements of creation, and with that power comes a responsibility to live up to the trust the goddess has placed in them.

As such, they will strive to make the life of the communities nearby better by running hospices, orphanages or shelters and by tending to wounds and diseases and generally providing relief to those seeking it. They never force themselves upon others and will instead let people come to them in need. Another lesser known aspect of the Church of Hala is the constant war that is fought with hags in Ravenloft.

Headquarters
There is no central authority and covens function independantly from one another.

The Weave
Devotees of Hala often speak of the Weave, a hidden web of magical power which flows through the natural world. According to them, the magic of the Weave is not arcane or divine, but something wholly different, the mystical pulse of the land and all its living creatures. Hags have learned to tap into the Weave and corrupt it to their whims, tangling it like a cat’s cradle on their wicked talons. For those who are pure of heart and wise in the ways of magic, however, the Weave can open up new realms of magical power, brimming with all the fury of nature Herself. These are the hallowed witches, those who have seen the pattern of the Weave and made it their ally, tool, and weapon. Their art is known as witchcraft, and in its pursuit they gather together in covens to fortify their power.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2014, 05:11:41 AM by Sheltatha »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2008, 02:35:03 AM »
Tales of the Ages : The Origin Myth of the Church of Hala

Quote from: Van Richten's Monstrous Hunting Compendium III
In the beginning there was Chaos, a swirling gray mass without form and with no more substance than air. The nine qods saw the Chaos, and they resolved to make the World, a place where those born of flesh would be left to their own devices.

The nine gods took the Chaos and etched patterns into it. They linked the patterns into the Weave. Upon the Weave, the gods built the World. The gods then found those born of flesh, and they placed them into the World.

Their work done, the gods withdrew from the World, believing it to be a place where those born of flesh would achieve both the greatest and darkest deeds possible. It would be a World shaped by the actions of those born of flesh, and the gods would interfere only by granting magical powers to their most loyal servants and those who gave them worship.

But one of the Nine Gods, she who is named Hala, knew more needed to be done. Alone among the gods, she felt the pain and suffering of the mortals that had been created to populate the World, and she could not stand idly by. The meager powers that the gods agreed to grant to their most loyal servants and those who gave them worship were not sufficient in Hala's mind.

However, the other gods would not permit any interference. The gods had agreed that beings born of flesh were the ones who were to shape the course of the World. The gods agreed that they would minimize their involvement. Hala claimed that none of them had foreseen what the World would become if those born of flesh were left to their own devices. She wanted to do more, so she took matters into her own hand and betrayed her promise to her fellow gods.

Hala reentered the World. She walked its hills and searched its villages. She searched for men and women who shared her desire to do more, who wanted to ease the pain and suffering of the mortals who had been created to populate the World.

Some of those born of flesh became her first priests, and to those she gave the gifts permitted by the other gods. From the ranks of her priests, she choose the Thirteen, her most devoted priests and priestesses, those who felt the pain and suffering of the mortals most strongly and who wanted to ease it. To these Thirteen, seven women and six men, she revealed the Weave and bound them to it. She granted them abilities like those of the gods. She gave them the ability to sense the Weave and the patterns the gods etched in Chaos when they created the World. She taught them how to use the Weave to further her goals and desires. Those born of flesh could not manipulate the Weave as effectiuely as the gods did, and the limitations of the flesh determined how the Weave would bend to their will. The gods had created males and females to be different, so their abilities to manipulate the Weave were different as well.

[...]

After she showed her thirteen chosen ones how to access the Weave, the men and women became envious of one another, each feeling the other sex had been granted a greater boon by Hala. This envy led to strife, and the Thirteen almost killed each other. Before the first witches and warlocks could establish which sex was the stronger, however, Hala stepped in, again violating the agreement between the gods and interfering directly in the affairs of mortals.

Hala showed the Thirteen more of the Weave, and the Thirteen saw that within every man was some of woman and within every woman was some of man. “We have been fools,” they told the Caregiver. “We will teach our children that despite our differences, men and women are also the same. But how can we be sure they will believe us and heed our teachings?”

Hala heard their words and knew that those born of flesh are frail and prideful. She had to do more to ensure that they could overcome their limitations. So she gave the Thirteen more secrets of the Weave, and through those they gained a greater understanding of each other: the women gained a greater understanding of the male side within them, and the males gained a greater understanding of the female side within them.

Hala chose to show them parts of the Weave that were crafted in such a way that the more witches or warlocks who banded together to draw on the Weave, the stronger their powers became and the more able they were to enact her will.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2008, 03:57:44 AM by EO »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2008, 02:49:00 AM »
Organization of the Church of Hala

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The Church of Hala has no primary center of power, strict hierarchy or an overarching structure. Instead, the Church is composed of various covens, shelters, safehouses, hermitages, orphanages and hospices scattered throughout the Core. No two hospices are alike and the differences between their structure varies from domain to domain. Whilst witches of Hala tend to be more open and have large hospices in lands like Mordent and Falkovnia, in places such as Tepest, Hazlan or Nova Vaasa, they must act secretly for fear of dire reprisals. In these lands, Halites never stay in one place for long and hospices and covens are either destroyed or forced to flee.

The image most have of Halites that of benevolent priests aiding the poor and the needy throughout the Core, however, they also carry a reputation as witches and warlocks due to the nature of their faith and their secrecy. An hospice will usually be ran by a congregation of brothers or sisters under the tutelage of a 'mother' or 'father' who acts as their superior. Depending on the size of the hospice, they may share dormitories of have private rooms, unless they do not sleep at the hospice. Because of the lack of unity and cohesion in the Church, it is not uncommon for two priests of Hala to meet one another without knowing the other is of the same faith or for Halites of Mordent to not be aware of the existence of Halites in Tepest.

Covens (Hallowed Witch PrC, detailed in Van Richten's Arsenal)

Quote from: Van Richten Monster Hunter's Compendium III
At a coven’s core is usually a witch or warlock of at least medium power, although according to the witches and warlocks I spoke with, there is no specific time at which a coven can or cannot be formed. Immature witches and warlocks are discouraged by their elders from forming or joining covens, as the experience of joining one is usually more emotionally challenging than many youngsters can handle. Also, there is an opinion among experienced coven members that it is important that a person know himself or herself as an individual before becoming part of a whole.

Regardless, a coven always starts with a single individual, no matter that person’s age or skill with magic. This is usually a person of strong convictions or who has a particular set of goals. The person then searches for individuals who share the same beliefs and goals, inviting them into the coven. The person who started the coven usually remains its leader until death, at which point the coven either dissolves or another of its members steps forward and assumes leadership. The latter result is more common than the former; usually, the other members are devoted to the goals of the coven and wish them to be carried forward. They share a wish to see the coven continue to grow in experience and ability.

The core of a coven is three witches or warlocks. This is the smallest membership a coven can have and still be a functioning coven. As soon as a third member is added to the coven, all three of its members gain the extra powers that come with coven membership. The coven then grows from that point, and as the coven increases in numbers so do the magical powers that can be tapped by its members. The largest and most powerful covens have a maximum of thirteen members.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2008, 07:42:11 PM by EO »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2008, 03:10:55 AM »
Halites in the Core - List of Hospices

Quote
Hospice of Healing Hands - A large and impressive building home to a significant contingent of Hala's witches located near Rotwald in Valachan. A vast library occupies nearly nine-tenths of the building. It is said to contain an ancient copy of the Tales from the Ages holy book. It is led by Mother Marena.
Hospice of the Three Hundred Wounds - An hospice located near Teuteldorf in Barovia.
Hospice of Bowed Heads - Located near the Letcher's Road in the Vigila Dimorta Forest of eastern Falkovnia, this Hospice claims to house the remains of several of the thirteen original witches and warlocks of Hala. It supposedly contains many relics, the most prominent one being the Skull of the Seventh, which protected the Hospice when the forces of Vlad Drakov tried to destroy it.
Sisters of Grace Hospice - This hospice located in Falkovnia was destroyed in 750 BC when a monster slaughtered the entire coven.
Sisters of Mercy Hospice - This Hospice is located in the city of Mordentshire. Sixteen sisters of Hala operate in this hospice which provides healing for sick. A few unnatural deaths were reported a dozen years ago and it is said that the late Doctor Van Richten investigated and solved the matter.
Sisters of Mercy Hospice - Another Hospice led by another congregation of the Sisters of Mercy was destroyed to the last witch in Falkovnia in 750 BC.
Hospice of the Doe - This hospice was located in the small village of Delmunster in Falkovnia. It was destroyed in 737 when a doppelganger plant decimated the town.
Blessed Hall of Ashington - At one point in its troubled existence, the Ashington Manor was a Hospice of Hala led by Byron
Ashington-Welles who sought to make the place into a proper hospice. For some seventeen years, he succeeded and the Hospice gained in popularity. However, after seventeen years, the entire coven was brutally slaughtered.
Sisters of Compassion Hospice - An hospice and a small coven operating in the slums of Port-à-Lucine. These Halites provide healing and shelter to the poor of the city.
Sanctuary of the Forgotten Lady - Just shy of the Borcan border in Richemulot, at the southern edge of the House of the Sages, stands a ruined chapel at the center of a stony meadow. A single caretaker, a blind and comely matron named Balihnda takes care of the place, despite its ruined state.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2008, 01:46:37 AM by EO »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2008, 03:20:52 AM »
Relationship with the Church of Ezra

Quote from: Van Richten's Monster Hunter's Compendium III
The Church of Ezra and the Church of Hala have always had a rocky relationship. The belief in Hala predates that in Ezra by a number of centuries, and some historians say that Ezra was a priestess of Hala before she ascended to godhood, a legend the Home Faith declares as heresy. Needless to say, as aggressive as the priests of Ezra have become in spreading their faith in recent years, this notion does not sit well with much of Ezra's clergy.

Nonetheless, the Great Cathedral, the central authority to which the many varied sects of Ezra look for their foundational doctrines, has made a point of stating that it considers the hospices operated by the Church of Hala to be a great benefit to all the people of the land. The Great Cathedral has also acknowledged Hala as a force for good in our dark land. However, it has stated an official distrust of Hala's church because of a claimed "hidden agenda" on the part of the governing hierarchy of Hala's church, an agenda that is kept secret even from many of the rank-and-file followers of Hala.

Many local priests have taken the distrust expressed by the Great Cathedral one step further and have started preaching against this supposedly secret side of the Church of Hala. As many clergymen are wont to do, they engage in hyperbole and create imaginary devils where none might be, telling the faithful that the Church of Hala might heal the body but in doing so corrupts the mind and soul.

Quote from: Ravenloft Gazetteer III
The unease between the two faiths stems from 701BC, when Praesidia Donella Borovsky issued an edict bluntly calling witchcraft hag magic, declaring that it invariably produced physical and spiritual corruption. The Home Faith never actively persecuted witches, but Borcans grew cold toward Hala's followers. Ironically, common Halite myth holds that the mortal Ezra was herself one of Hala's priestesses, a legend the Home Faith declares as heresy. Praesidia Kristyn Stoyista, Borovsky's successor, rescinded the edict in 732 BC, but to this day, Hala's witches often become scapegoats when "panics" arise.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2008, 03:45:15 AM by EO »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2008, 03:35:50 AM »
Relationship with the Church of the Lawgiver

Quote from: Van Richten's Monster Hunter's Compendium III
The importance of confirming that a target is not innocent applies strongly to dealings with priests of the Lawgiver, or even that church's hierarchy. The Church of the Lawgiver is the most outspoken critic of the Church of Hala, and the former actively persecutes the latter's clergy and worshipers. Priests of the Lawgiver have always believed Hala's ranks to contain many warlocks and witches. Priests of the Lawgiver believe all witches and warlocks are engaged in a grand conspiracy devoted to undermining the authority of the legitimate rulers of our land's domains. As such, the Church of the Lawgiver and its priests view the Church Of Hala as actively working against them and the goals of their god, one of which is the strengthening rightful rulers of our lands. There are virtually no hospices operated by the Church of Hala in regions where the Church of the Lawgiver is strong. However, that does not mean that witches, warlocks, and covens of Hala are not active in such areas. A number of covens operate secretly in the countryside of Hazlan, where the Lawgiver's worship is strongest, opposing that domain's tyrannical wizard-lord at every turn.

Witches, warlocks, and the Church of Hala itself have never made any bones about the fact that they will always take steps to ease the pain and suffering of people everywhere. If the source of the suffering is the ruler Of the land in which they dwell, the doctrine of Hala can be interpreted to mean that those faithful to her must oppose such rulers in all things. This does not necessarily mean taking up arms against the ruler; if a worshiper of Hala is dead, how can he or she help those in need? For example, at one time there were two small witch covens operating secretly in the domain of Hazlan, where they subtly worked to undermine the notion among the populace that the racial group known as the Mulan rule because of divine sanction. These witches were in grave danger from Hazlik the Red Wizard, Hazlan's undisputed tyrant, as well as enforcers of the Church of the Lawgiver, who would kill them for their blasphemy. These covens were even at risk from adventurers and monster hunters in Hazlan, for they hid in exactly the places where one expects to find hags: the barren wilderness in the western and northern parts of the domain. These covens have since moved elsewhere.

Still, Church of Hala hospices frequently serve as havens for the persecuted, and Hala's clergy often works closely with opposition groups. For example, in the eastern part of the domain of Invidia was once a hospice reportedly offering solace to those Gundarakites who were weary of Barovian oppression and eventually fled in search of better lives. This hospice, too, has had to move elsewhere to save itself.

Quote from: Ravenloft Gazetteer V
Divine magic is accepted if and only if it flows from the Lawgiver. When the Church of the Lawgiver deigns to admit the existence of other gods, it places them in subordinate roles, labeling them as servants of the Lawgiver and essentially powerless in their own right. Both Ezra and Hala, for example, are officially codified as the Lawgiver's concubines. Therefore, according to Church dogma, any cleric performing miracles in the name of a god other than the Lawgiver must be a liar and a heretic, drawing his magic from arcane or even demonic sources. Imprisonment is the kindest fate a - heretic - can hope for, so servants of other gods would be wise not to call attention to themselves with flashy displays of divine power.

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2008, 03:41:30 AM »
Relationship with the Tepestani Inquisition

Quote from: Ravenloft Gazetteer V
Hala is reviled in Tepest. Where she is considered a merciful goddess of healing and beneficial magic in just about every other land, the Tepestani view her as a patron of the fey and a protector of those who consort with them. Inquisitor Finn of Viktal promised that worshippers of Hala unmasked by the Inquisition would be executed after only the most perfunctory of trials. Members of covens will be burned at the stake, Finn is convinced that they are fey in human guises.

The hatred toward Hala and her followers comes from three sources, arising from the lack of concern about historical and intellectual accuracy that typifies the mindset of so many Tepestani. First, there is an epic of ancient Tepestani heroes questing against a woman named Hallah, who attempted to usurp the gods and seize control of the destiny of all mortals by spinning magical threads that represented each mortal life. By weaving these threads into tapestries, she dictated fates, and by cutting threads she ended lives. Second, the Inquisition believes that Hala may have been one of the three original corrupted wise women or that she may be the fey creature who seduced those women. The Inquisition dismisses any suggestion that the version held by Hala's followers is anything but lies to shroud their evil natures. Some more recent bardic tales have merged modern beliefs with the ancient epic song and cast Hala as one of the fey who originally seduced the Tepestani wise women and who continues to spin deadly magical threads that corrupt all who become entangled in them. Finally, there are the aforementioned facts that worshippers of Hala refer to themselves as Witches and Warlocks and that the Tepestani translations for those titles imply inherent evil. Tepestani logic dictates that anyone who goes out of their way to describe themselves as evil must be evil.

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2008, 04:10:42 AM »
Sayings

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Person A: “Greetings, Sister. May Hala’s left hand bless you with health’’
Person B: “And her right hand bless you with happiness.”
 (Chilling Tales)
Quote
By Hala the Caregiver!  (Van Richten's Monstrous Compendium III)
« Last Edit: May 31, 2009, 11:31:47 AM by EO »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2009, 10:26:29 PM »
On priests' marriages

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Hala is the goddess of healing. What place is there for earthly love in such a calling? That kind of love is a cancer, corrupting the mind through the body. The only vow I have taken or would wish to take, is to purify the world from disease.  (Children of the Night: Vampires)

On witches and warlocks' marriages

Quote from: Van Richten's Monstrous Compendium III
Aside from a clearer image of hags, I became aware of something else while reading Marena’s family history and records. It became clear to me that while they all served the Church of Hala, they also seemed to be part of another group, one that they assumed the reader knew and thus was referred to only obliquely. It seemed to be a form of magical society, but one into which they were born or married, and one that was divided between the sexes, with males and females practicing different kinds of magic.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 08:12:06 PM by EO »

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Re: Church of Hala - Roleplay Resources
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2017, 08:31:46 PM »
To clear up some misunderstandings, there are both witch/warlock covens and a traditional priesthood of Hala. Both serve the same goddess and are aware of each other and work together, but they are not the same. Much of this confusion is due to the fact that Halan witches and warlocks must disguise themselves as priests to avoid persecution.

Quote from: Van Richten's Monster Compendium III

The Church of Hala: The most noble goals in life are to ease the suffering of the sick, to empower the weak and downtrodden, and to help those in need. These goals are primarily pursued through the hospices that can be found in virtually every domain. The Church of Hala does not actively proselytize its religion, and the hospices are always open to anyone in need. If someone expresses an interest in learning more about Hala. priests are always happy to talk about their goddess, but they do not do so uninvited. Generally speaking, the Church of Hala is of neutral good alignment.

Priestesses of Hala tend to wear simple robes and veils, while priests wear robes with large hoods. The color of the robes vary depending on the order, but they are mostly white or powder blue. Priests do not typically carry weapons, although they might or rare occasions if part of an adventuring party, When they do, they are limited to using blunt weapons.

Relations with the Church of Hala

Obviously, relations here are mostly good, as the Church of Hala and the witches and warlocks of our land are almost entirely synonymous. However, until recently many low-ranking members of the priesthood did not understand that the majority of those staffing the faiths hospices and centers of learning were not priests at all, in the traditional sense. While the majority of Hala's clergy is favorably disposed toward witches and warlocks, as the clergy is granted at least the same degree of insight into their ways as I was, there are exceptions.

The clergy of the Church of Hala is supportive of warlock and witch covens, assuming they are not devoted to furthering evil goals. The priests frown strongly on solitary witches existing outside the confines of their hospices and monastic orders, and actively oppose any solitary warlock who comes to the clergy's attention. Priests of Hala are greatly concerned about rogue warlocks, fearing that the destructive capabilities given to them by the Weave (or Hala, in the mind of many priests) will cause more suffering in the world than it will ease. According to Marena, several priests of Hala have cooperated with priests of Ezra or Bane in order to see a rogue warlock eliminated from an area.

Although my opinion is entirely irrelevant in this matter, I find myself in agreement with the priests of Hala, although I have to wonder if they should not be concerned about solitary witches as well. Far too often have I seen men and women who started out good at heart become corrupted by their own power because they became enamored with what they could do with it. Even without the ability to practice highly subtle magic, such people can do great harm to many innocents before stopped.

Considering the destructive potential of warlocks-a potential that is not even necessarily arrived at through years of study and devotion to the arcane art forms, so it is power gained without experience or concerted effort-I worry that an individual warlock would put his desires ahead of anything else and draw on the Weave to fulfill those desires in the quickest way possible. Such a person might cause a great deal of harm to anyone unfortunate enough to cross his path. Solitary witches are cause for concern because they, too, have the ability to use the Weave to bend people to their will, although they are far more likely to do it in a subtle fashion, using their magic to charm and beguile their way to success. Like the warlock, their powers are not always earned through hard work, and therefore solitary witches might not have the wisdom to resist the temptation to abuse those powers.

As will become clear in the next chapter, covens can help prevent warlocks and witches from falling to the temptation of pursuing power for its own sake. While covens give individual warlocks and witches more power, they also make them part of a whole and place their responsibility to that whole foremost in their minds. Priests of Hala want witches and warlocks to be possessed with a sense of community so that they can effectively further the church's goals through the powers of the Weave-which, as you recall, were given to them by Hala for the purpose of improving the lot of mortals in this tortured world.

Witch/Warlock covens are a separate part of the Halan religion from the priesthood, although they work together. Witches/Warlocks pass their powers down through their descendents, so they often marry and have children (in fact, one has to be born into the tradition to become a witch/warlock; it is not something a person can convert to). The non-witch/warlock priesthood, however, seems to have a monastic tradition, with nuns and friars who apparently do not marry or have children.

Since we do not currently have a means to mechanically reproduce the natural-born powers of Halan witches/warlocks, it is assumed that players would be playing non-witch/warlock Halan priests.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2017, 08:36:40 PM by Bluebomber4evr »

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