Ravenloft: Prisoners of the Mist

Public (OOC) => Ravenloft discussion => Ravenloft Resources => Topic started by: Zarathustra217 on January 02, 2010, 10:28:45 AM

Title: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Zarathustra217 on January 02, 2010, 10:28:45 AM
Flavouring your roleplay with language-specific words can be excellent for adding a feel of ethnicity and detail to the world. However, always keep in mind that not everyone may be fully in to the vocabularies, so use it with moderation - mainly for flavouring - and be ready to explain to players what your character is saying if they are in doubt.

Following is a list of the main languages spoken in the Core:

    * Akiri (Harakir) Egyptian
    * Avergnite (Staunton Bluffs) Probably English
    * Balok Romanian
    * Darkonese Latin
    * Dwarven Norse
    * Elven Welsh
    * Falkovnian German
    * Forfarian (Forlorn) Gaelic (Scottish)
    * Gnomish Greek/ Latin
    * Heldannic (Graben Island, Nocturnal Sea) Nordic
    * Lamordian Plautdietsch
    * Luktar Hungarian
    * Mordentish, High French
    * Mordentish, Low Anglo-Saxon
    * Patterna any and all
    * Pazarian Arabic
    * Rajian (Sri Raji) Hindi
    * Souragnien - Cajun
    * Tepestani (Tepest) Gaelic (Irish)
    * Vaasi Nowegian/ Danish
    * Vos (Vorostokov) Russian
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Zarathustra217 on January 02, 2010, 10:29:13 AM
Balok

The predominant language of Barovia, Balok is often described as having thick, guttural consonants and is not particularly pleasant to the ear. It is the language of ethnic Barovians, but is also the primary language of Borca and Invidia. The real life counterpart of the language seems to be Romanian.

Primary Language in: Barovia, Borca, G'Henna, Invidia

Secondary Language in: Hazlan, Kartakass, Richemulot, Sithicus, Verbrek

Sample Vocabulary

good morning; good day: bun ziua
goodbye: adio
yes: da
no: nu
help!: ajutor!
go away!: se duce!
night: noapte
gypsy; thief: tigan
ceats: mist; fog
om, oamensc: man
femeie: woman
child: copil
life: viata
death: moarte
love: iubire
poison (noun): mreg
conspire: comploia
money: bani
day: zi
sun: soare
moon: luna
town: oras
inn: han
betrayal: tradare
jealousy: geloize

To help flavour the native roleplay further, here is also a list of common Romanian phrases:

Standard phrases

Breakfast: "micul dejun" (MEE-kool deh-ZHOON)
Buddy / Friend: "prieten" (Pre-Eh-Ten)
Bye: "Pa" ("PAH")
       "Servus" [sehr-VOOS] (in informal occasions in Barovia (/Transylvania))
Damn it!: "La dracu!" (la Drah-coo)
Devil: "Drac" (Drahc)
Excuse me. (Getting attention): "Pardon" (pahr-DOHN) or "Vă rog" (vuh ROHG)
Excuse me. (begging pardon, moving through crowd): "Pardon" (pahr-DOHN)
Fine, thank you.: Mulţumesc, bine." (mool-tzu-MESK BEE-nay)
Go away!: "se duce!" (se du-ssa)
Go to the devil!: "Dudevilte dracului!" (Doo-Devil-Te Drah-Cool-e)
Good-bye: "La revedere" (lah reh-veh-DEH-reh)
               "adio" (ah-dio)
Good day: "Bună ziua" (BOO-nuh zee-wah)
Good evening: "Bună seara" (BOO-nuh syah-ruh)
Good morning: "Bună dimineaţa" (BOO-nuh dee-mee-NYAH-tzuh)
Good night (to sleep): "Noapte bună" (NWAHP-teh BOO-nuh)
Hello!: "Salut." (sah-LOOT)
         "Bună!" (BOO-nuh)
Help!: "Ajutor!" (ah-zhoo-TOR)
Hi!: "Ha!" (Hah)
Horse: "Cal" (cal)
How are you?: "Ce mai faci?" (cheh my FAHTCH)
I can't speak Balok [well].: "Nu vorbesc [bine] Balok." (NOO vor-BESC [BEE-nay] Bah-lohk)
I don't understand: "Nu nţeleg" (NOO oohn-tzeh-LEG)
I'm Hungry: "Mi-e Foame" (Me-ae fo-ah-may)
I'm Thirsty: "Mi-e Sete" (Me-ae set-te)
I'm Tired: "Mi-e Somn" (Me-ae sohm)
I'm Scared: "Mi-e Frica" (Me-ae fri-cah)
I'm sorry: "mi pare rău" (oohm pah-reh RUH-OH)
Is there someone here who speaks Balok?: "Vorbeşte cineva aici Balok?" (vor-BESH-teh CHEEH-neh-vah AY-eetch Bah-lohk)
Job: "ocupaţie" (ohcoo-pah-te-eh)
Knight: "cavaler" (Kah-vah-lar)
Lady: "doamnă" (Doam-nah)
Left: "stnga" (STOOHN-gah)
Look out!: "Atenţie" (ah-TEN-tzee-eh)
Lunch: "dejun" (deh-ZHOON)
Miss ______: "domnişoară _______" (DOM-ne-SO-ahra)
Mist / Fog: "ceats" (seh-ah-tsa)
Mister ______: "domn ______" (DOMN)
My name is ______.: "Numele meu e ______." (NOO-meh-leh MEH-oo yeh ______.)
Name: "nume" (noo-me)
Nice to meet you.: "ncntat" (oohn-kahn-taht) or "mi pare bine" (OOHM pah-reh BEE-neh)
No: "Nu" (NOO)
Please: "Vă rog" (vuh ROHG; usually follows the request.)
Right: "dreapta" (DRYAP-tah)
See you soon: "Pe curnd" ("peh cur-OOHND")
Straight ahead: "drept nainte" (DREHPT oohn-ay-EEN-teh)
Temple: "templu" (tem-ploo)
Thank you: "Mulţumesc" (mool-tzoo-MESK)
Thank you very much: "Mulţumesc mult." (mool-tzoo-MESK moolt)
What is your name? (formal): "Cum vă numiţi? (coom vuh noo-MEETZ)
What's your name? (informal): "Cum te cheamă? (coom teh KYAHM-uh)
Witchcraft: "vrajă" (vrah-jah)
Yes: "Da" (DAH)
You're welcome: "Cu plăcere" (koo pluh-CHAIR-eh)

Problems

Am I under arrest?: Sunt arestat? (SOONT ah-rest-AHT ?)
I'll call the guards.: "Chem garda." (kem Gahrd-ah)
Guards!: "Garda!" (Gahrd-ah!)
I haven't done anything wrong.: N-am facut nimic rău. (NAHM fah-COOT nee-MEEC RUH-oh)
I lost my bag.: "Mi-am pierdut valiza" (mee-AHM pee-ehr-DOOT vah-LEE-zah)
I lost my wallet.: "Mi-am pierdut portmoneul/portofelul." (mee-AHM pee-ehr-DOOT POHRT-mohn-eh-ool/POHRT-o-FEH-Loo)
I'm lost.: "M-am rătăcit" (mahm ruh-tuh-CHEET)
I'm sick.: "Sunt bolnav." (SOONT bohl-NAHV)
I need your help (formal "your").: "Am nevoie de ajutorul dumneavoastra" (AHM neh-VOY-eh deh ah-ZHOO-tohr-ool doom-nyah-VWAH-strah)
I need your help (informal "your").: "Am nevoie de ajutorul tău" (AHM neh-VOY-eh deh ah-ZHOO-tor-ool tuh-oo)
It's an emergency.: "E o urgenţă" (YEH oh oor-JEHN-tzuh)
I've been injured.: "Sunt accidentat." (SOONT ahk-chee-dehn-TAHT)
I need a priest.: "Am nevoie de preot" (AHM neh-VOY-eh deh preh-oth)
It was a misunderstanding.: A fost o nenţelegere. (AH fohst oh neh-uhn-tzeh-leh-geh-reh)
Leave me alone.: "Lasă-mă n pace" (LAH-suh muh oohn PAH-cheh)
Stop! Thief! : "Stai! Tigan!" (STAAY! HOHTZ!)
Where are you taking me?: Unde mă duceţi? (OON-deh muh DOOH-chets)

Numbers


1: unu (OO-noo)
2: doi (doy)
3: trei (tray)
4: patru (PAH-troo)
5: cinci (cheench)
6: şase (SHAH-seh)
7: şapte (SHAHP-teh)
8: opt (ohpt)
9: nouă (NOH-uh)
10: zece (ZEH-cheh)
11: unsprezece (OON-spreh-zeh-cheh, usually shortened to just unşpe, OON-shpeh even in formal speech; similarly, for all numbers up to 19)
12: doisprezece (DOY-spreh-zeh-cheh)
13: treisprezece (TRAY-spreh-zeh-cheh)
14: paisprezece (PIE-spreh-zeh-cheh)
15: cincisprezece (CHEENCH-spreh-zeh-cheh)
16: şaisprezece (SHY-spreh-zeh-cheh)
17: şaptisprezece (SHAHP-tee-spreh-zeh-cheh)
18: optsprezece (OPT-spreh-zeh-cheh)
19: nouăsprezece (NO-uh-spreh-zeh-cheh)
20: douăzeci (DOH-uh ZETCH)
21: douăzeci şi unu (DOH-uh ZETCH shee OO-nu)
22: douăzeci şi doi (DOH-uh ZETCH shee DOY)
23: douăzeci şi trei (DOH-uh ZETCH shee TRAY)
30: treizeci (TRAY ZETCH)
40: patruzeci (PAH-troo ZETCH)
50: cincizeci (CHEENCH ZETCH, but often more like CHEEN-zetch)
60: şaizeci (SHAH-ee ZETCH)
70: şaptezeci (SHAHP-teh ZETCH)
80: optzeci (OHPT zetch)
90: nouăzeci (NO-uh ZETCH)
100: o sută (OH SOO-tuh)
105: o sută cinci (OH SOO-teh CHEENCH)
200: două sute (DOH-uh SOO-teh)
300: trei sute (TRAY SOO-teh)
400: patru sute (....)
500: cinci sute
600: şase sute
700: şapte sute
800: opt sute
900: nouă sute
1000: o mie (oh MEE-eh)
2000: două mii (DOH-uh MEE)
1,000,000: un milion (OON mee-LEE-ohn)
half: jumătate (joo-muh-TAH-teh, often shortened to joo-MAH-teh)
less: mai puţin (MY poo-TZEEN)
more: mai mult (my moolt)
number: numărul

Time

day: zi (OH ZEE)
hour: oră (OH OHR-uh)
midnight: miezul nopţii (mee-EHZ-ool NOHP-tzee)
month: lună (OH LOO-nuh)
night: noapte (no-ahpte)
noon: prnz (proohnz)
today: astăzi(ah-STUHZ)
tomorrow: mine (MUY-neh)
week: săptămnă (OH suhp-tuh-MOOHN-uh)
year: an (oon AHN)
yesterday: ieri (yehr)

Colors

black: negru (NEH-groo)
white: alb (ahlb)
gray: gri (gree)
red: roşu (ROH-shoo)
blue: albastru (ahl-BAH-stroo)
yellow: galben (GAHL-behn)
green: verde (VEHR-deh)
orange: portocaliu (pohr-toh-KAH-lee-oo)
purple: mov (mohv)
brown: maro (mah-ROH)


Monsters / Foes

hag: hrcă (hahr-kah)
ghost: strigoi (strii-goi)
gypsy: tigan (tih-gan)
phantom: fantomă (fahn-toh-mah)
undead: imorţii (e-mor-tee)
vampire: vampir, vrolok  (vam-pihr, fro-lohk)
werewolf: vrcolac (wahr-coh-lahk)
wolf: lup (loop)
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Zarathustra217 on January 02, 2010, 10:31:58 AM
Luktar

The language of the ethnic Gundarakites has alternately been described as having a sing-song cadence or a hive of angry wasps. The real life counterpart is Hungarian.

Primary Language in: ethnic Gundarakites in Barovia and Invidia

Secondary Language in: Borca

Standard phrases

Cheers!: "szervusz!" (sar-voos)
Do you speak Luktar?: Beszl luktarul? (BE-seyl look-tahr-ool?)
Excuse me. (getting attention): Elnzst. (EL-ney-zeysht)
Excuse me. (begging pardon): Sajnlom. (Sai-nah-lom)
Fine, thank you.: Ksznm, jl. (K-s-nm, yoal)
Freedom: "szabadsg" (sczah-bah-dsahg)
Goodbye: Viszontltsra. (VEE-sont-la-tash-r)
Goodbye (informal): Viszlt/Szia. (VEES-lat/SEE-)
Good morning. (before around 9 AM): J reggelt! (yoa REG-gelt)
Good morning. (after 9 AM): J napot! (yoa N-pot) 
Good afternoon.: J napot! (yoa N-pot)
Good evening.: J estt! (yoa ESH-teyt)
Good night.: J jt! or J jszakt! (yoa eyt / yoa EY-s-kat)
Hello.: Szervusz. (SER-voos)
Hello. (informal): Szia. (SEE-) [like English "See ya!", (what a coincidence!)]
How are you?: Hogy vagy? (hodj vdj)
I can't speak Luktar.: Nem beszlek luktarul. (nem bas-ce-lag look-tahr-ool)
I don't understand.: Nem rtem. (nem EYR-tem)
I'm sorry.: Bocsnat. (BO-cha-nt)
My name is ______ .: "______ vagyok." ( _____ V-djok.)
Nice to meet you.: rvendek. (R-ven-dek)
No.: Nem. (nem)
Please.: Krem. (KEY-rem)
Thank you.: Ksznm. (K-s-nm)
to rebel: "fellzad" (fa-la-zscahd)
tyrant / king: "zsarnok" (szcahr-nok)
What is your name?: Hogy hvjk? (hodj HEEV-yak?)
Yes.: Igen. (EE-gen)
You're welcome.: Szvesen. (SEE-ve-shen)

Problems

Go away!: Menjen innt! (man-jane enat)
Help!: Segtsg! (SHE-geet-sheyg!)
Look out!: Vigyzz! (VEE-djaz)


Source: Wikipedia Hungerian Phrasebook; Ravenloft Gazetteer I
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Zarathustra217 on January 02, 2010, 10:37:08 AM
Falkovnian

The spoken language of Falkovnia. The real life counterpart of the language is German.

Primary Language in: Falkovnia

Secondary Language in: -

Standard phrases

(Not official, but old fashioned high German)

Breakfast: "Frhstck" (fruee-shtueek)
Buddy / Friend: "Freund" (froynd)
Bye: Tschss" ("tshueess")
Damn it!: "Verdammt!" (fair-dahmt)
Devil: "Teufel" (toy-fel)
Excuse me.: "Entschuldigung" (ant-shuhl-dee-goong)
Fine, thank you.: "Gut, danke" (goohd, dank-a)
Go to the devil!: "Zum Teufel mit Dir!" (zom toy-fel meet deer)
Good day: "Guten Tag" (goohten tahg)
Good evening: "Guten Abend" (goohten ah-bent)
Good morning: "Guten Morgen" (goohten morgen)
Good night (to sleep): Gute Nacht" (goohte na-ch-t)
Hello!: "hallo" (hah-lo)
Help!: "Hilfe!" (hee-lfe)
Horse: "Pferd" (pfa-rd)
How are you?: "Wie geht's?" (wee gayt's)
I can't speak Falkovnian.: "Ich kann kein Falkovnianisch." (Ichh kahn kighn Falkovnianish)
I don't understand: "Ich verstehe nicht" (Ichh fair-shtay-a nichht)
I'm Hungry: "Ich habe hunger" (Ichh hahb-a hoon-gar)
I'm Thirsty: "Ich habe durst" (Ichh hahb-a doorst)
I'm Tired: "Ich bin mde / muede" (ichh been muy-da)
I'm Scared: "Ich frchte / fuerchte mich" (ichh fuyr-chta meechh)
I'm sorry: "es tut mir Leid" (as toot meer layd)
Is there someone here who speaks Falkovnian?: "Ist hier jemand, der Falkovnian spricht?" (Ist here ie-mahnt dar Falkovnian spreechht)
Job: "Arbeit" (ahr-beyt)
Knight: "Ritter" (reet-air)
Lady: "Dame" (dah-ma)
Left: "links" (links)
Look out!: "Achtung" (achh-toong)
Lunch: "Mittagessen" (meet-ahg as-ssen)
Miss ______: "Frulein / Fraeulein _______" (froy-leyn)
Mister ______: "Herr ______" (hair)
My name is ______.: "Mein Name ist ______." (meyn nahm-a isst ______.)
Name: "Name" (Nahm-a)
No: "Nein" (neyn)
Please: "bitte" (beet-a)
Right: "rechts" (ra-chhs) (direction)
         "richtig" (reech-teg) (correct)
See you soon: "Bis bald" ("beess bahlt")
Straight ahead: "geradeaus" (ga-rah-da-ou-ss)
Temple: "Tempel" (tem-pal)
Thank you: "Danke" (dahn-ka)
Thank you very much: "Vielen Dank" (veel-an dahnk)
What is your name? (formal): "Wie ist Ihr Name? (wee isst eer nah-ma) (old fashioned)
What's your name? (informal): "Wie heit Du? (wee hey-sst doo)
Witchcraft: "Hexerei" (hex-a-rey)
Yes: "Ja" (ia)
You're welcome: "Bitte" (bee-ta)


Problems

Am I under arrest?: Bin ich unter Arest?
I'll call the guards.: Ich werde die Wache rufen!
Guards!: Wache!
I haven't done anything wrong.: Ich habe nichts Falsches gemacht!
I lost my bag.: Ich habe meine Tasche verloren.
I'm lost.: Ich habe mich verirrt.
I'm sick.: Mir ist schlecht.
I need your help (formal "your").: Ich brauche Ihre Hilfe!
I need your help (informal "your").: Ich brauche Deine Hilfe!
It's an emergency.: Es ist ein Notfall!
I've been injured.: Ich wurde verlezt!
I need a priest.: Ich brauche einen Priester.
It was a misunderstanding.: Es war ein Missverstndnis.
Leave me alone. (spoken to one person): Lass mich alleine!
Leave me alone. (spoken to a group): Lasst mich alleine!
Stop! Thief! : Halt! Dieb!
Where are you taking me?: Wo bringt Ihr mich hin?


Military

At your comand! - Zu Befehl!
Attack! - Angriff!
Army - Armee
Battle - Schlacht
Battlefield - Schlachtfeld
Captain - Hauptmann
Destroy them! - Vernichtet sie!
General - General
Honor - Ehre
Impale - pfhlen
No sir - Nein, Herr!
Officer - Offizier
Sergeant - Unteroffizier
Soldier - Soldat
Staff Sergeant - Feldwebel
Torture - Folter
War - Krieg
Yes sir! - Jawohl!


[to be continued]

A little more Falkovnian:

My name is _____ (informal)
Ich hei _____ (i-ch- hyss)

Missus
Frau (frou)

Subhuman(s) (derogatory for demihumans and other nonhumans)
Untermensch(en) (oon-ter-mensh, oon-ter-men-shin)

Magic
Zauberkunst (tsou-ber-koonst)

Sorcery
Zauberei (tsou-ber-eye)

Sorcerer
Zauberer (tsou-ber-er)

Sorceress
Zauberin (tsou-ber-in)

Wizard
Hexenmeister (hex-en-my-ster)

Witch, Hag
Hexe (hex-a)

Sword
Schwert (shvairt)

Notes:
The Umlauts, , can be written ae oe ue, respectively.
can be written as ss. Not all instances of ss are appropriately written as , however.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Zarathustra217 on January 02, 2010, 10:41:34 AM
Vaasi

This language is described as having harmonious vowels.

Primary Language In: Hazlan, Nova Vaasa, Kartakass, Valachan

Secondary Language In: Barovia, Darkon, Invidia, Mordent, Graben Island, Liffe, Sithicus, Tepest, Verbrek

Sample Vocabulary:

good day: godaag
goodbye: afsked
yes: jao
no: ikke
help!: jaal!
leave this place!: afgaa herfra opstille!
magic: trolddom, trylleri
wizard: trolddommem
fire: skyde, arfbrand
man: mennekene
woman: kvinde
child: barn
life: liv
death: endeligt
love: elske, have kaer
music: musik, noder, tonlist
timber: tmmer
day: daag
night: natten
sun: solen
moon: moarne
town: byan, plads
inn: kroen
thank you: takk
spirit: spkelse
tax: skatt
horse: hest
horseman, rider: hestmand
cat: kat
crime: forbrydelse
grass: graes
nobleman: delmand
commoner: lavmand
merchant: kbmand
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:08:28 PM
Mordentish

This language is separated into two distinct dialects with entirely different vocabularies and even different grammar. "High" Mordentish is spoken by the nobility, while "Low" Mordentish is spoken by the common folk. The mingling of these two dialects has created an incredibly flexible language that is widely regarded throughout the world as the language of literature.

In comparison to real world languages, "Low" Mordentish is analagous to Anglo-Saxon or Old English, while "High" Mordentish is comparable to French.

Primary Language in: Borca, Mordent, Dementlieu, Richemulot, Verbrek, Ghastria

Secondary Language in: Darkon, Dominia, Falkovnia, Invidia, Lamordia, Sithicus, Valachan

"Low" Mordentish Sample Vocabulary:
 
"Low" MordentishEnglish
wes thu halgreetings, farewell (lit. "be you well")
gieseyes
neseno
Ia! eala!ah! alas!
faran aweg!go away!
searopainting
bokcrftliterature
plegendeperformance
daegday
nihtnight
heathusigel, sl, sunnesun
mnamoon
tntown
hs, inn, tcirhsinn
feorh, gst, scuccaspirit
holm, mereocean, sea
brimseashore
lyfthelm, mist, nipmist, fog
burgcity
delsathsewer
rtrat
werrtwererat
forggendtrespasser
thelingnoble (noun)
bkere, sclerescholar
lwendtraitor
byrde, weligaffluent
searocrftigastute
begietan dun!get below! (a common curse)
carl, mann, rincman
fmne, wif, wewoman
bearnchild
liflife
feorhgedal, swyltdeath
cwealmmurder
lufrdenlove
ator, lybbpoison (noun)
reonianconspire
mynett, sceattmoney
wealdforest
ariver
huntahunter
ulphwolf
worulphwerewolf
bealudangerous, unwise
ceasterbuendfool, outsider, civilized person

"High" Mordentish Sample Vocabulary:

"High" MordentishEnglish
bonjourgreetings
adieufarewell
ouiyes
nonno
oh! hlas!oh! alas!
en allez vous!go away!
peinturepainting
littratureliterature
prsentationperformance
jourday
nuitnight
soleilsun
lunemoon
villetown
aubergeinn
fantmeghost
ocan, merocean, sea
brume, brouillardmist, fog
goutsewer
salaudbastard
intrustrespasser
savantnoble (noun), scholar
tratretraitor
malinaffluent, astute
decendre!get below! (a common curse)
hommeman
femmewoman
enfantchild
vielife
mortdeath
meurtemurder
amourlove
poison, toxine, veninpoison (noun)
comploterconspire
argentmoney
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:11:48 PM
Darkonese

The language of Darkon is both complex and highly structured. It has not spread far from Darkon's borders, but the immense size of the kingdom and its huge population are enough to ensure the significance of the language. Since Darkon has a large demihuman population, many of them mix Darkonese with their racial tongues. Many wizards have found that the precise definitions found in the language make for ideal magical writings.

In comparison to real world languages, Darkonese is analogous to Latin.

Primary Language In: Darkon, Necropolis

Secondary Language In: Falkovnia, Lamordia, Nova Vaasa, Liffe, Dominia, Tepest

Sample Vocabulary:

DarkoneseEnglish
salve!greetings!
vale!goodbye!
itayes
minimeno
adiuva me!help!
abi!go away!
miraedivine magic, wonders
morsdeath
nuntiusinformation
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:14:08 PM
Lamordian

Lamordian is a flat and guttural language which superficially resembles a mixture of Darkonese, Falkovnian, and Mordentish. The Lamordian alphabet has hundreds of sounds such as dipthongs and slurs that would be considered entirely new letters in other languages. Lamordian has euphemistic compound words, odd idiomatic expressions, and a needlessly complex system of tenses and genders. Lamordians are very proud of their language and make it a point to correct foreigners who mispronounce a word or make a grammatical error.

Lamordian is analgous with the Swiss language of the real world.

Primary Language In: Lamordia

Secondary Language In: Darkon, Falkovnia, Dementlieu, Dominia

Sample Vocabulary:

LamordianEnglish
goodendachgreetings (good day)
aufscheetgoodbye
joyes
nno
halpe!help!
aufriese!go away!
oatstphysician
fe'nunftrationality, reason
stiemblizzard
je'spanstphantom, bogeyman
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:18:09 PM
Forfarian

Forfarians in Forlorn speak this language in exclusion to any other. Forfarians in other lands are taught this language alongside the native tongue of their adopted homeland. The Forfarian language is often described as "brogue."

In comparison to real world languages, Forfarian is analogous to Scottish Gaelic.

Primary Language in: Forlorn

Secondary Language in: Barovia, Hazlan

Sample Vocabulary:

ForfarianEnglish
daenacht haelgreetings
beannachd leatgoodbye
naeno
seadhyes
cuidich!help!
rach air falbh!go away!
bcanghost
ghaidhealtachdhighlands
ndurnature
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:21:06 PM
Old Kartakan

Kartakass possesses its own, entirely distinct language known as Old Kartakan. This difficult language was apparently the common tongue of the Kartakans prior to the Occupation (Kartakans claim that they were once occupied by Invidia), though today it is all but extinct, spoken only by the elderly or to add an air of dignity to formal affairs. In a sense, it has become a language of secrets.

In comparison to real world languages, Old Kartakan is analogous to Serbian.

Primary Language In: none

Secondary Language In: Kartakass

Sample Vocabulary:

Old KartakanEnglish
pozdravgreetings
zbogomgoodbye
oyes
neno
pomoct!help!
poctde stran!go away!
lubezenlove
loviti volkovewolf
glasbamusic
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:23:51 PM
Sithican

This elven language is noted for its sibilants, which earns the Sithicans the derogatory nickname of the "hissing elves." To the learned ear, numerous Sithican words and phrases seem oddly dissonant, hinting that they may have been borrowed from languages otherwise unknown in these lands.

Sithican has no real world analogue. It is identical to the language spoken by the Silvanesti elves of Krynn.

Primary Language In: Sithicus

Secondary Language In: Barovia, Kartakass, Valachan, Verbrek

Sample Vocabulary:

SithicanEnglish
e'roessthe sun rises (common greeting)
e'naessthe sun sets (common farewell)
syes
ustno
aos!help!
kelos!go away!
lothdarkness
nelinstranger
sereonforest
rothihirtyrant
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:27:00 PM
Tepestani

The Tepestani language is composed of harsh, phlegmatic sounds, making it sound as if the speakers are constantly clearing their throats. Until recently, it had no written form. Wyan of Viktal has now come up with a written text of the Tepestani language to be used for the Inquisition's court records.

In comparison to real world languages, Tepestani is analogous to Irish Gaelic.

Primary Language in: Tepest

Secondary Language in: Nova Vaasa, Darkon


Sample Vocabulary:

TepestaniEnglish
dicht duitgods save you (common greeting)
slngoodbye
beicht/is lom/is eayes (I will/it is/I am)
aon, nlno
fir!help!
imigh leat!go away!
draochtwitchcraft, arcane magic
cailleach/draodirwitch/warlock
tstiltrial
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:28:41 PM
Rokuma

The native language of Rokushima Tiyoo has an open-syllable sound pattern, so that most syllables end in a vowel. In Rokuma, a person's speech depends on his or her present surroundings and his or her social status. Compared to many languages of the Core, Rokuma grammar is relatively simple. Complicating factors such as gender articles and distinctions between plural and singular are missing almost completely. Conjugation rules for verbs and adjectives are simple and almost free of exceptions. Nouns are not declinated at all, but appear always in the same form. It is the written form of Rokuma that many foreigners find difficult. There are no less than three different written forms of the language: two sets of phonetic characters (one for native words, the other for foreign words), and one set of symbolic characters. The language is written vertically, from right to left, another factor which many foreigners find confusing.

In comparison to real world languages, Rokuma is analogous to Japanese.

Primary Language in: Rokushima Tiyoo

Secondary Language in: none


Sample Vocabulary:

RokumaEnglish
konnichiwagood day
konbanwagood evening
sayonaragoodbye
haiyes
ieno
taskete!help!
tchini ike!go away!
girihonor
onidemon
obakeghost
gaijinforeigner, barbarian
shimin sensocivil war
gomennasaiI apologize
baka!fool!
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on January 02, 2010, 09:34:12 PM
Patterna

The language of the Vistani is a strange one, being a mixture of the common tongue, several humanoid dialects, and a unique slang, unspoken by any race other than the Vistani. Many non-Vistani find the language maddening, because patterna is conveyed more by context and intonation than by meaning or root words. Many ordinary words in the common tongue have no translations in patterna. In fact, Vistani dialect appropriates non-Vistani words when needed, without interrupting the rythm of speech.

Primary Language in: none; only spoken by Vistani

Secondary Language in: none; only spoken by Vistani, although Barovia has many non-Vistani speakers of patterna due to the special status the Barovian government has given the Vistani.


Sample Vocabulary:


PatternaEnglish
endari-vitirfarewell (lit. "all paths converge")
kir-yahgset up camp (lit. "make fire")
koorahexclamation of agreement (lit. "utterly true")
lunadiit shall be done (lit. "by the moon")
vishnaddjustice (lit. "dark blade")
giorgionon-Vistani
giomotohalf-Vistani
giamargahalf-Vistani, half-elf
spiunispy
marhimeunclean
vujopure
baxtluck
armayacurse
lowemoney
trampabarter
tshoravsteal
hamishagosmeddle, disturb
paminteannative
anda l themathe lands beyond
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Feronius on January 16, 2011, 05:07:21 PM
Possibly a good reference to enhance your Mordent RP? I think it might be usefull for something at least (other than comical relief!)
Although not directly applyable as Low Mordentish, possibly interesting to add to your Common? If not feel free to delete this post.

Old english source:
http://www.medieval-faire.com/speak.html (http://www.medieval-faire.com/speak.html)
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on January 16, 2011, 05:24:18 PM
except that isn't the language of mordent. they speak -old english- you know the time durring the anglo-saxons, before the norman invasion of 1066. this is old english  Hw spyc es us, h dysega; hw mg synna forgyfan bton god na. which according to this  (http://babaev.tripod.com/archive/grammar41.html#1)site means, 'How can this man talk like that? He is blaspheming.Who can forgive sins but God?'
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Zedrik on January 16, 2011, 09:03:26 PM
Possibly a good reference to enhance your Mordent RP? I think it might be usefull for something at least (other than comical relief!)
Although not directly applyable as Low Mordentish, probably a possibly good accent in Common? If not feel free to delete this post.

Mordent accent? / Olde englishe source:
http://www.medieval-faire.com/speak.html (http://www.medieval-faire.com/speak.html)

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe

Quote
This sort of faux-Shakespearian writing is popularly called "Old English", though it isn't

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/HistoryOfEnglish

Quote
Actual Old English, which developed after the Anglo-Saxon-Jute invasion/colonization/settlement/takeover of England in about the 5th century and was spoken until the early Middle Ages

Quote
As an example, the first two lines of a 7th century poem called "Cdmon's Hymn" are:
Quote
Nu scilun herga hefenrics uard
metuds mehti and his modgithanc
... which, even with "and his" having helpfully survived unchanged, is just about impossible for the modern English speaker to turn into
Quote
Now let me praise the keeper of Heaven's kingdom,
The might of the Creator, and his thought
... without having studied Old English.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: WildPirate13 on January 17, 2011, 12:04:53 PM
Nice!  :D
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Feronius on January 17, 2011, 12:11:21 PM
I'd still like to use the accent for something sometime, hehe
Is there any other olde englishe kind of language in any D&D universe? It cracks me up.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on March 31, 2011, 12:18:26 AM
Oh, I would like to mention something that I have seen brought up a few times by some people and that is the concept of vaasi being the common tongue. It is not, common is just common which is only there for convince sake. If I am in the wrong for posting this, or that vaasi is the common tongue, feel free to correct me.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: HellsPanda on March 31, 2011, 04:38:15 AM
Blue once said it was by mistake, this lead to a widespread confusion on the matter. He sometime later corrected himself, but it will take time for everyone to get it.
I still prefer the idea of one of the worlds languages would be Common, instead of there existing some mystical common tongue that somehow had developed that was different than all other languages, but that all people could easily learn
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on April 02, 2011, 08:50:11 PM
Yeah it was a mistake on my part.

Vaasi is NOT COMMON!
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on April 06, 2011, 10:18:37 AM
If anyone is interested in Mordentish as it is Old English, I found an Anglo-Saxon Dictionary (http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/books/asd/dict-L.html) that might be useful for them.  Hope that helps anyone out.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on October 14, 2011, 04:41:35 PM
Just a reminder to people to please use these foreign words in moderation--remember, a little goes a long way. When used sparingly they add some flourish to your roleplay, when overused they become a crutch. There's no hard or fast rule, but a general guideline is no more than 1/3rd of the words in a sentence should be foreign.

Some tips:

 :arrow: Remember that most of these other languages have different grammatical rules and slang phrases than english, so using a direct translation will result in clunky, inauthentic dialogue. For example, the phrase "not bad" in French is not "pas mal," it would actually be "ne mal pas." I'm not at all suggesting that you have to take a course in these foreign languages in order to roleplay, but if you're not sure what the phrase or what the word translates into, don't use it, because things like babelfish or altavista just give you mangled gibberish.

 :arrow: Similar to above, taking a composite word in english (such as "anyone") and translating it into some half-english/half-romanian word like "anyunu" just sounds silly and weird (the actual phrase would be "oricine" which means "whoever").

 :arrow: The actual amount of words used, as well as the particular words used, should be easily inferred by someone not familiar with the words. Pick a few words that your character would always use (like "da" for "yes") to be consistently understood. People should be able to figure out what those words mean by the context of what you're saying and what english words you're using in conjunction with them.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Heretic on October 14, 2011, 04:49:30 PM
Nuuuuuuu, ceea ce vorbeşti, da? I am a real Barovian, da?

Vraja, Vraja şi zei, vă rugăm să vă rugăm să Oh, face Mihas nu mai fie un incepator pic, va rog.. [!]  

 -_^


Spoiler: show
What blue said. ;)
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on October 14, 2011, 05:47:16 PM
To expand on the tips above, here's some examples of when the use of non-english words become too much:

Take the phrase "it's good, yes?"

"it's good, da?" <-- good
"it's bun, da?" <-- pushing it
"este bun, da?" <-- overkill
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Nemien Callishan on October 14, 2011, 05:50:02 PM
Yeah it was a mistake on my part.

Vaasi is NOT COMMON!

And for those who haven't cottoned on yet Pidgin English is Common :p. And that's not a core language in Ravenloft :p.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Alternate Account on March 15, 2012, 10:43:04 PM
Looking for information on the Thaani language. Haven't found much cannon side. I know the majority of ethnic Thaani would be living in and around Immol. Thus Balok would be what they speak now. But what do we know about their original language. Is it even remembered?, has it a written script?

Thanks
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on March 15, 2012, 11:46:43 PM
Looking for information on the Thaani language. Haven't found much cannon side. I know the majority of ethnic Thaani would be living in and around Immol. Thus Balok would be what they speak now. But what do we know about their original language. Is it even remembered?, has it a written script?

Thanks
It's never been named or described.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on March 16, 2012, 12:40:11 AM
Judging how Thaani names are of a Islamo-Turkic origin. You could probably do some sort of Islamo-Turkic faux language.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on March 16, 2012, 02:56:06 AM
Judging how Thaani names are of a Islamo-Turkic origin. You could probably do some sort of Islamo-Turkic faux language.
I tend to give Thaani NPCs Albanian names
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on March 16, 2012, 02:57:33 AM
Ooh. That is a good idea too and still goes along with Islamic/Eastern naming conventions. Also you get to use Albanians and that makes Albanians smile!
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Crimson Shuriken on March 16, 2012, 04:30:30 AM
I had envisioned a somewhat of a language isolate like Armenian. But its an interested topic Thaani, since it was never explicitly stated
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: DM Tarokka on March 16, 2012, 09:14:13 AM
Albanian is an interesting language which recalls, to some extent, ancient Greek, and other Slavic languages, but it has its own autonomy. It's anyway indo-european as origin, whereas Turkish is not. Most languages used in the Core have anyway indo-european references (Neo-Latin, Latin, German, Scandinavian, Slavic, etc). Maybe this mystery could be linked to an extra indor-european reference. I'm just digressing and pondering here.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on March 16, 2012, 09:24:00 PM
 The actual origins of Albanian are still disputed by people in the Linguistics field because there are crazy nationalists trying to claim some sort of 'Perso-Illyrian' super language. It is indo-european but its recent history has given it a lot of near-eastern (persian, arabic), turkic and general islamic vocabulary considering it is still today a Sunni-muslim majority nation. It was also ruled over the Ottoman Empire. The area was subject to a lot of forced assimilation because of its rebellious nature. Albanians have a badassed history though, but I won't list that here.

But given the Turkic/Islamic names that the Thaani are listed with in the sources and the general badassedness of Albanian that would be a great choice for Thaani. If you would like Blue - I could compile a friendly list of words/a few phrases in Albanian for a player to use?

(Also you probably already know of this Tarokka, but give this a looksie.) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arb%C3%ABresh%C3%AB)
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: DM Tarokka on March 17, 2012, 07:54:29 AM
The charm of the history of languages, the more I discover, the more I want to find out...
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on March 18, 2012, 03:03:24 PM
The actual origins of Albanian are still disputed by people in the Linguistics field because there are crazy nationalists trying to claim some sort of 'Perso-Illyrian' super language. It is indo-european but its recent history has given it a lot of near-eastern (persian, arabic), turkic and general islamic vocabulary considering it is still today a Sunni-muslim majority nation. It was also ruled over the Ottoman Empire. The area was subject to a lot of forced assimilation because of its rebellious nature. Albanians have a badassed history though, but I won't list that here.

But given the Turkic/Islamic names that the Thaani are listed with in the sources and the general badassedness of Albanian that would be a great choice for Thaani. If you would like Blue - I could compile a friendly list of words/a few phrases in Albanian for a player to use?

(Also you probably already know of this Tarokka, but give this a looksie.) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arb%C3%ABresh%C3%AB)
Yeah, that's kind of why I went with it. It's kind of a cross between the Middle East and the Balkans. Go for it if you want to make a list of phrases, etc.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Corsair6500 on June 03, 2012, 09:06:05 PM
I want to check something here - since Earth is a possible setting of origin for a character, it's conceivable that a character might know Hungarian, or Romanian, or some other language that the language on here is derived from. Would Romanian seem identical to Balok, or would it seem to be like a cousin dialect - you might be able to understand some phrases, but the language is decidedly different, or would they be completely different?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on June 06, 2012, 01:36:28 PM
This seems like the best spot to place this link!

I have found a really good name site with good names for the time frame that the domains repersent. It is s-gabriel (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/); it has almost any group available, hungarian, russian(really really extensive russian names)) italian, spanish, german, french, and so on and so on. Might be useful for helping people who need some name help. So I hope this link can help people out :)
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Kendric98 on June 06, 2012, 02:08:35 PM
This seems like the best spot to place this link!

I have found a really good name site with good names for the time frame that the domains repersent. It is s-gabriel (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/); it has almost any group available, hungarian, russian(really really extensive russian names)) italian, spanish, german, french, and so on and so on. Might be useful for helping people who need some name help. So I hope this link can help people out :)
Bookmarked, very usefull.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on June 20, 2012, 02:25:12 PM
Another interesting fact, Lamordian is not a swiss language, which doesn't exist but instead Lamordian coresponds to the Plautdietsch  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mennonite_Low_German)or Mennoite Low german language.  Here is a dictionary  (http://www.mennolink.org/doc/lg/)for anyone interested :)
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on June 20, 2012, 03:11:25 PM
Lamordian actually is very close to Swiss-German (the phrases we have), which is an Alemannic Dialect. This is not a coincidence - Dr. Mordenheim is based on Dr. Frankenstein, which - if you are familiar with the story by Mary Shelley is actually a Swiss German. As the Domains tend to reflect their masters, the people there also speak a Swiss German type language. The dialects you talk about are very close to the Palatinate region and are a Low Franconian language. Even the names they give in the lists for the Domain, are fairly Swiss German.

The domain may have access to the sea (Which in the Germanic-Language Sprachbunde, a lot of the Low Franconian language are located, Dutch, Flemish, Luxemburgeish, Plattdeutsch, etc...) its mostly based on Switzerland from what I can tell because the place is also mountainous and has really cold winters.

So you're better off checking this out here:

Swiss German Phrases! (http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/swissgerman.php)

Also google. lol.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on June 20, 2012, 03:38:17 PM
I want to check something here - since Earth is a possible setting of origin for a character, it's conceivable that a character might know Hungarian, or Romanian, or some other language that the language on here is derived from. Would Romanian seem identical to Balok, or would it seem to be like a cousin dialect - you might be able to understand some phrases, but the language is decidedly different, or would they be completely different?
No. I realize they used Romanian words in the books, but that's mainly as a representation -- IC and In-Universe, Balok isn't derived from Romanian. They're completely different languages with no relation to each other as far as IC world goes.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on June 22, 2012, 03:15:20 PM
Question: is High and Low Mordentish, 1 language but two vastly diffrent deliects as the source books indicate or are they two seperate languages?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on June 22, 2012, 04:06:41 PM
Question: is High and Low Mordentish, 1 language but two vastly diffrent deliects as the source books indicate or are they two seperate languages?
From the IC perspective, the people of Ravenloft consider it one language with 2 different dialects. I think, though -- and this is really just my own opinion,that this is because both "dialects" are actually separate languages that were both simultaneously introduced to the demiplane from Mordent, and their true origin as separate languages is lost due to the domain's false history and so on.

OOC game mechanics-wise, they'd be 2 separate languages.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on October 19, 2012, 08:49:46 PM
question! what language is vaasi supposed to be trying to immatate, danish?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Mark Johansen on October 19, 2012, 09:36:37 PM
question! what language is vaasi supposed to be trying to immatate, danish?

It's an mix between Danish, Norwegian and Swedish from what i understand.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on November 07, 2012, 12:46:26 AM
Some more Forfarian words according to chris nicholas's notes on the domain :)

hello - daenacht hael
goodbye - beannachd leat
please - ms e do thoil e
thank you - taing thu
yes - seadh
no - nadh
help! - cuidich!
go away! - rach air falbh!
Mists - saoghal ce
Where is an inn? - cite bi an sda
castle - caisteal
druid - druid
goblyn - car fiacail mar
highlands - ghaidhealtachd
nature - ndur   
vampire - fuilfarng
ghost - bcan
lich - mgl cor
werebeast - atharr-beathach
golem - rinn deuine
ancient dead - seann bs
fiend - olc
Vistani - frinneach meirleach
hag - bean mar
 tartan - breacan
treant - craobh coisich
tree - craobh
wolf - madadh-allaidh
oak - darach
rowan - caorann
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: DM Stygian Witch on November 07, 2012, 12:59:51 AM
Can someone point me in the right direction for  * Akiri (Harakir) Egyptian
Thanks
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on November 07, 2012, 01:20:21 AM
Can someone point me in the right direction for  * Akiri (Harakir) Egyptian
Thanks
I'm pretty sure Lockleed made a post about Akiri phrases somewhere

EDIT: I was right, he did: http://www.nwnravenloft.com/forum/index.php?topic=21862.msg261529#msg261529
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: DM Stygian Witch on November 10, 2012, 07:52:38 PM
Thanks
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Truth_USMC on July 09, 2013, 10:20:36 PM
anything for har'akir?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on July 09, 2013, 10:27:25 PM
anything for har'akir?

Phrase   Meaning  
Yeh.Hi.  Informal greetings.
Iiti.Hello.
Em Hotep.(Greetings) In Peace, often used as a formal greeting.
Em Hotep Nefer.(Greetings) In great peace, often used as a formal greeting.
Em Hotep Nefer Weret!        (Greetings) In very great peace, often used as a formal greeting.
Senebty. / Senebti.Farewell, or "Be well."
Em heset net Ra.Be in favor of Ra. (or replace Ra with another deity)
Dua Netjer en ek.Thank you or "Thank God for you." to a man.
Dua Netjer en etj.  Thank you or "Thank God for you." to a woman.
Iiwy.Welcome.
Nefer sedjmek."May you hear only good things." to a man.
Nefer sedjmetj."May you hear only good things." to a woman.
Aw ibek."May your heart rejoice." to a man.
Aw ibetj."May your heart rejoice." to a woman.
Ib. / Ab.Heart.
Nefer.Beautiful or good.
Hotep.Peace.
Neter. / Netjer.God.
Netjer.Goddess.
Haitey.Mourner.
Itja.Thief.
Ebien.Wretched, poor man.
Eibata.Servant, slave.
Behau.Coward.
Nti hati.Senseless man, or fool.
Ha-her.Foul face.
Seba.Devil.
Ntui.Worthless ones.
Deshr.Red, connotation with Set and evil.
Ankh.Life, and the symbolic reference (Ankh) means the same.
Udja.Strength.
Seneb.Health.
Shewtey.Merchant.
Neb.Lord.
Neb-i.My Lord.
Nebet.Lady.
Nebet-i.My Lady.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Telkar on August 05, 2013, 10:42:23 AM
Just begun playing a character from Vechor, but haven't seen any mention of parallel RL language and phrases, though by googling I saw it mentioned in connection to Greek and that the 'E' on their forehead is actually epsilon.

Any thoughts on this?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Perkele on August 05, 2013, 11:31:05 AM
Just begun playing a character from Vechor, but haven't seen any mention of parallel RL language and phrases, though by googling I saw it mentioned in connection to Greek and that the 'E' on their forehead is actually epsilon.

Any thoughts on this?

Vechorite might be inspired by Latin? The names are Latin at least.

If I'm not wrong, it's also been stated somewhere on this forum that Vechor is based on some lost civilisation in Greyhawk campaign setting.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 05, 2013, 03:17:18 PM
Just begun playing a character from Vechor, but haven't seen any mention of parallel RL language and phrases, though by googling I saw it mentioned in connection to Greek and that the 'E' on their forehead is actually epsilon.

Any thoughts on this?

Vechorite might be inspired by Latin? The names are Latin at least.

If I'm not wrong, it's also been stated somewhere on this forum that Vechor is based on some lost civilisation in Greyhawk campaign setting.
It is, and the civilization is a Greco-Roman pastiche (both the original lost civilization on Oerth and the current domain in Ravenloft), with an Iron Age level of technology.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on August 05, 2013, 03:29:18 PM
Is Darkon also a mirror of Greyhawk stuff?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Telkar on August 05, 2013, 03:55:49 PM
Okay, thanks for the info! Suppose I can use some latin for spice then.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 05, 2013, 03:56:21 PM
Is Darkon also a mirror of Greyhawk stuff?
It's very loosely based on Greyhawk's Great Kingdom prior to the Greyhawk Wars (584 CY). The Great Kingdom, in turn was a very loose pastiche of the Byzantine Empire and the Holy Roman Empire.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on August 05, 2013, 04:23:16 PM
Haha. Interesting. So basically both domains with Greyhawk people (I guess also Cavitius from the name) use kinda latin/greek?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 05, 2013, 04:39:32 PM
Haha. Interesting. So basically both domains with Greyhawk people (I guess also Cavitius from the name) use kinda latin/greek?
Sort of, but they are listed as having different languages. Greyhawk's Great Kingdom is just as much based on the Holy Roman Empire as the Byzantines, and remember, the Holy Roman Empire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roman_Empire) is not actually the same thing as the Roman Empire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Empire).

Cavitus and Tovag, which no longer exist, were based off of different parts of Greyhawk lore. Vecna and Kas, former darklords of both domains, were originally of the Flan people, who are Greyhawk's vaguely quasi-Celtic culture.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Budly on August 06, 2013, 07:25:36 PM
Haha. Interesting. So basically both domains with Greyhawk people (I guess also Cavitius from the name) use kinda latin/greek?
Sort of, but they are listed as having different languages. Greyhawk's Great Kingdom is just as much based on the Holy Roman Empire as the Byzantines, and remember, the Holy Roman Empire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roman_Empire) is not actually the same thing as the Roman Empire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Empire).

Cavitus and Tovag, which no longer exist, were based off of different parts of Greyhawk lore. Vecna and Kas, former darklords of both domains, were originally of the Flan people, who are Greyhawk's vaguely quasi-Celtic culture.

Far from, Holy Roman Empire disbanded itself 1806. :) More German then Roman.

But. What about Gothic Earth languages and their similar languages in Ravenloft. Can people understand each others? Dementliue - France in Gothic Earth for example?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on August 06, 2013, 07:36:20 PM
french person from france: bonjour monsieur
dementlieuse person from demtnlieu: bonjour monsieur
both: what the hell did you just say

also gothic earth PCs have to deal with not having common, meaning communication bloody sucks/is very difficult
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Perkele on August 06, 2013, 07:59:07 PM
To reply on the Holy Roman Empire..

It wasn't Holy, it wasn't Roman and it wasn't an Empire.

And yeah.. It's kind of part of the experience when playing a Gothic Earth character. Communication is hard.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 06, 2013, 09:56:44 PM
Haha. Interesting. So basically both domains with Greyhawk people (I guess also Cavitius from the name) use kinda latin/greek?
Sort of, but they are listed as having different languages. Greyhawk's Great Kingdom is just as much based on the Holy Roman Empire as the Byzantines, and remember, the Holy Roman Empire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roman_Empire) is not actually the same thing as the Roman Empire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Empire).

Cavitus and Tovag, which no longer exist, were based off of different parts of Greyhawk lore. Vecna and Kas, former darklords of both domains, were originally of the Flan people, who are Greyhawk's vaguely quasi-Celtic culture.

Far from, Holy Roman Empire disbanded itself 1806. :) More German then Roman.

But. What about Gothic Earth languages and their similar languages in Ravenloft. Can people understand each others? Dementliue - France in Gothic Earth for example?
No, they are treated as separate languages.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Budly on August 07, 2013, 05:38:43 PM
Hmm I see.

I always although played that common was more or less simply English.

Cause if we gonna be picky here. Why would Commong (trade tongue?) Be the same in Krynn, Faerun and other DnD settings? Logically speaking they should not be the same language.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 07, 2013, 06:02:45 PM
Hmm I see.

I always although played that common was more or less simply English.

Cause if we gonna be picky here. Why would Commong (trade tongue?) Be the same in Krynn, Faerun and other DnD settings? Logically speaking they should not be the same language.
I've already answered this before, but there's enough canonical crossovers between the settings from Planescape and Spelljammer that a common trade tongue could exist, and having "Common" be the same between worlds is a legitimate option in the Ravenloft Dungeon Master's Guide.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on August 07, 2013, 06:42:50 PM
blue with the publication of rasputin must die from paizo, not to mention the fact that mulhorandi and thus Thay, have connections to Earth. In rasputin the characters go from golarion to 1918 russia to kill Rasputin, also their are zombies and animated tanks and a headless horsemen and it is all crazy awesome! with Mulhorandi, and their succusors like thay, IIRC they are -explictly- stated to be ancient egyptians taken from earth to the realms. I am sure I can find more examples.

So with these sort of connections, and I am sure that there is more, perhaps earth characters can have common? since every other realm -including lands that don't have common- have common; i think it would make sense for common to be allowed for Gothic Earth PCs.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 07, 2013, 07:01:56 PM
blue with the publication of rasputin must die from paizo, not to mention the fact that mulhorandi and thus Thay, have connections to Earth. In rasputin the characters go from golarion to 1918 russia to kill Rasputin, also their are zombies and animated tanks and a headless horsemen and it is all crazy awesome! with Mulhorandi, and their succusors like thay, IIRC they are -explictly- stated to be ancient egyptians taken from earth to the realms. I am sure I can find more examples.

So with these sort of connections, and I am sure that there is more, perhaps earth characters can have common? since every other realm -including lands that don't have common- have common; i think it would make sense for common to be allowed for Gothic Earth PCs.
I don't see how that Rasputin/Pathfinder thing changes anything, or how it would have any bearing on this server.

As for the Mulan, even if they did come from Gothic Earth, it would have been one-way and they would have access to Common after they came to Toril, not before.

Moreover, unlike the Ravenloft DMG, the official books for Masque of the Red Death and other works connected to the Gothic Earth (2nd ed. Historical Reference books, D20 Modern, etc.) have no allowance for a Common Tongue.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on August 07, 2013, 07:10:30 PM
So what about the lands that also do not have a common language? should they not take common as well?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 07, 2013, 07:44:40 PM
So what about the lands that also do not have a common language? should they not take common as well?
such as?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on August 07, 2013, 07:57:34 PM
So what about the lands that also do not have a common language? should they not take common as well?
such as?

here are four

Tha (D20 Swashbuckling adventures) (no common tongue, all languages are earth-based, e.g. Montaigne is French, Eisen is German)
The Old World (Warhammer Fantasy) (no common tongue, again the human languages are based on earth with Reikspiel being German and Breton as French)
Middle Earth (Lord of the Rings/Hobbit) (Westron as a common tongue, isn't related to D&D common at all, elvish (Sindarin/Quenya) is unrelated to D&D elvish)
Golorion(pathfinder) 'common' is either Taldane in the Inner Sea region or Tien in Tien-xia

Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Badelaire on August 07, 2013, 08:57:20 PM
Gotta say, that's just needlessly complicating things. At the end of the day, if your PC can't communicate with others because it doesn't speak or can't learn the "common" tongue then you're looking at a very short lived concept. More of a gimmick than a three dimensional character someone is going to stick to. It's fantasy after all, suspension of disbelief and all that.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on August 07, 2013, 09:00:28 PM
Gotta say, that's just needlessly complicating things. At the end of the day, if your PC can't communicate with others because it doesn't speak or can't learn the "common" tongue then you're looking at a very short lived concept. More of a gimmick than a three dimensional character someone is going to stick to. It's fantasy after all, suspension of disbelief and all that.

Which is why I am saying that gothic earth PCs should have common.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 07, 2013, 09:08:32 PM
So what about the lands that also do not have a common language? should they not take common as well?
such as?

here are four

Tha (D20 Swashbuckling adventures) (no common tongue, all languages are earth-based, e.g. Montaigne is French, Eisen is German)
The Old World (Warhammer Fantasy) (no common tongue, again the human languages are based on earth with Reikspiel being German and Breton as French)
Middle Earth (Lord of the Rings/Hobbit) (Westron as a common tongue, isn't related to D&D common at all, elvish (Sindarin/Quenya) is unrelated to D&D elvish)
Golorion(pathfinder) 'common' is either Taldane in the Inner Sea region or Tien in Tien-xia


Golorion/Pathfinder is quasi-D&D and is assumed to have Common. Those other worlds don't really count. We won't stop someone from playing a character from those worlds, but they're so rare and don't last long.

As far as the Gothic Earth goes, it has been stated in Ravenloft canon that they do not speak Common. Domains of Dread details how Odiare is from Gothic Earth's Italy and that Common is unknown to them and that characters must use the Comprehend Languages spell to communicate with the people there. It's just one of the unique quirks of characters from that world, and it has been the rule since we've allowed it as a background.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Budly on August 08, 2013, 05:02:17 AM
Hmm I see.

I always although played that common was more or less simply English.

Cause if we gonna be picky here. Why would Commong (trade tongue?) Be the same in Krynn, Faerun and other DnD settings? Logically speaking they should not be the same language.
I've already answered this before, but there's enough canonical crossovers between the settings from Planescape and Spelljammer that a common trade tongue could exist, and having "Common" be the same between worlds is a legitimate option in the Ravenloft Dungeon Master's Guide.

Sounds like a poor excuse to make it ease of use for DM's and players in PnP :P Bit sad! But okay, I get it.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Gaul on August 08, 2013, 10:18:54 AM
I'm quite sure I'm not iterating anything that hasn't been discussed at length here before, but I'll chime in on my view of languages.

In Dungeons and Dragons, language is a skill.  It is something you invest points in and acquire proficiency just as you would opening locks or concentrating.

The limitations of the NWN engine with respect to coding and leveling make this a very difficult thing to truly implement, and as always, we as players struggle to divide these limited points across a range of skills that will allow the character to be proficient enough to function a role within the game.  This is balanced against the character background, character development and exposure to language over time as a means of becoming proficient in a given tongue.  This does not cleanly stack against the mechanics of the game, given that a person could for example be somewhat bright and spend a lot of time around elves, but never quite go adventuring, yet becomes fully familiar with the language quite validly.  Extend the hypothesis across a range of situations, and the logic of the dilemma is clear.

Language, at base, is about communicating concepts that relate to one another and mean something in context of other words and symbols in a collective genre.  It is easy to observe the crossover, slang, prefix, suffix and context of romance languages (French, Spanish, Latin, etc.) in relation to one another, because they are very similar in structure and vary only in diction and grammar--they are based on roman letters, and are far easier to relate than say, Chinese radicals or Japanese calligraphy--which again have many crossovers and dialects that are more or less recognizable within geographic regions.  The ability to connect the pieces of these puzzles is limited by the scope of a person's intelligence and exposure, and desire to learn.  Romance languages are very harshly literal in how they connect, but Asian "letters" more or less paint a picture of a scene, concept or idea that relates as the character becomes more complex and sophisticated, and this meaning changes rapidly in relation to other "word-pictures" in succession, like an idea unfolding instead of a line projecting directly forward.  That is why they are difficult to learn.

This is all important to take into consideration when deciding exactly how much knowledge of language your character possesses upon entry to Ravenloft, and even more so as he or she grows in exposure to other languages (such as Balok) that he or she may encounter.  The more similar the character's native culture, and the greater his or her intelligence, the smoother this transition shall be.

The best idea I can come up with to bridge this dilemma is to assign yourself a native language, and full proficiency in another per point of intelligence bonus, a broken proficiency for an odd score (i.e., 16 int means your native tongue, full proficiency in three others, 17 int would be another broken proficiency in addition).  If your intelligence grows, you should be able to add additional proficiencies.  Moreover, the character should be becoming proficient in languages that he or she is exposed to and intelligent enough to grasp the context of the conversation, save all mitigating circumstances.

I'd like to hear opinions about this idea, it's how I've been operating thus far, and I'd like a little clarification on the subject before I sit down and write my character's bio.  Perhaps I missed something.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 08, 2013, 11:34:29 AM
Hmm I see.

I always although played that common was more or less simply English.

Cause if we gonna be picky here. Why would Commong (trade tongue?) Be the same in Krynn, Faerun and other DnD settings? Logically speaking they should not be the same language.
I've already answered this before, but there's enough canonical crossovers between the settings from Planescape and Spelljammer that a common trade tongue could exist, and having "Common" be the same between worlds is a legitimate option in the Ravenloft Dungeon Master's Guide.

Sounds like a poor excuse to make it ease of use for DM's and players in PnP :P Bit sad! But okay, I get it.
Not everything needs to be complicated and realistic, Budly :roll:
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 08, 2013, 11:39:26 AM
I'm quite sure I'm not iterating anything that hasn't been discussed at length here before, but I'll chime in on my view of languages.

In Dungeons and Dragons, language is a skill.  It is something you invest points in and acquire proficiency just as you would opening locks or concentrating.

The limitations of the NWN engine with respect to coding and leveling make this a very difficult thing to truly implement, and as always, we as players struggle to divide these limited points across a range of skills that will allow the character to be proficient enough to function a role within the game.  This is balanced against the character background, character development and exposure to language over time as a means of becoming proficient in a given tongue.  This does not cleanly stack against the mechanics of the game, given that a person could for example be somewhat bright and spend a lot of time around elves, but never quite go adventuring, yet becomes fully familiar with the language quite validly.  Extend the hypothesis across a range of situations, and the logic of the dilemma is clear.

Language, at base, is about communicating concepts that relate to one another and mean something in context of other words and symbols in a collective genre.  It is easy to observe the crossover, slang, prefix, suffix and context of romance languages (French, Spanish, Latin, etc.) in relation to one another, because they are very similar in structure and vary only in diction and grammar--they are based on roman letters, and are far easier to relate than say, Chinese radicals or Japanese calligraphy--which again have many crossovers and dialects that are more or less recognizable within geographic regions.  The ability to connect the pieces of these puzzles is limited by the scope of a person's intelligence and exposure, and desire to learn.  Romance languages are very harshly literal in how they connect, but Asian "letters" more or less paint a picture of a scene, concept or idea that relates as the character becomes more complex and sophisticated, and this meaning changes rapidly in relation to other "word-pictures" in succession, like an idea unfolding instead of a line projecting directly forward.  That is why they are difficult to learn.

This is all important to take into consideration when deciding exactly how much knowledge of language your character possesses upon entry to Ravenloft, and even more so as he or she grows in exposure to other languages (such as Balok) that he or she may encounter.  The more similar the character's native culture, and the greater his or her intelligence, the smoother this transition shall be.

The best idea I can come up with to bridge this dilemma is to assign yourself a native language, and full proficiency in another per point of intelligence bonus, a broken proficiency for an odd score (i.e., 16 int means your native tongue, full proficiency in three others, 17 int would be another broken proficiency in addition).  If your intelligence grows, you should be able to add additional proficiencies.  Moreover, the character should be becoming proficient in languages that he or she is exposed to and intelligent enough to grasp the context of the conversation, save all mitigating circumstances.

I'd like to hear opinions about this idea, it's how I've been operating thus far, and I'd like a little clarification on the subject before I sit down and write my character's bio.  Perhaps I missed something.
It's actually not hard at all to implement a language system in NWN, but our scripters do not wish to implement such a system because they feel it would lead to more clique-like behavior than already exists. Personally I feel it would not change the level of that sort of behavior and would reduce metagaming, but I'm in the minority. Anyway, the existing D&D rules regarding language are much easier than what you're describing and are adequate for us and can be followed even if we do not have a mechanical system in place to prevent you from understanding languages your PC doesn't know.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Gaul on August 08, 2013, 02:10:21 PM
Actually, I'm in agreement with you.  Anything to curb metagaming through mechanical measures is a worthy investment in my opinion, so I'll join the minority.

The real difficulty in stacking mechanic against circumstance that I'm discussing is how much of the "pieces" of language a character would recognize, growing over time with respect to intelligence.

If you're familiar with Final Fantasy 10, think of it like finding the Al Bhed translation journals.  You slowly begin to get an idea of what's going on, but it's a process.

And yes, the process of language here is very much a matter of clique.  I have not seen it used for any other reason than to talk over people's heads yet.  Why not give it the mystery it's owed?  I'm not sure what resources the server is running on, or how much space is available to make those changes.  Of course, it's just a matter of altering strings of text, which isn't hard.  I have seen it implemented very well on other servers, and I thought it was very nifty.

It would also really serve to limit people just "assuming" they know everything about language as it is expressed (like me)  :P
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: queenofspades on August 08, 2013, 08:59:26 PM
Here's a notion. Since some languages are based off rules counterparts would a French person for example have an easier time learning this language more than say a chondathan or balk native speaker? Also I do not think that it would be as hard for a smart gothic earth character to learn the trade tongue as I believe that asking as they don't speak a language that does not use thorass they would be working from the same lettering. That being thorass, like most languages, save ose written in dethek etc...
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 09, 2013, 02:16:33 PM
I don't think it would a good idea to complicate the language learning rules beyond the standard D&D rules. Having to keep track of which langauge is easier to learn than others depending on the languages you already know would just make things needlessly complex.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: OITF on August 09, 2013, 03:31:16 PM
I think, personally, people are considerate enough to moderate their own characters ability to learn other languages.

Maybe I'm just an optimist, though.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Norture on August 09, 2013, 03:42:48 PM
Wow. Could you imagine the manpower that would be required to police something like that. And not only that, the giant linguistic nerd arguments about what languages are related to what. DM burnout would increase tenfold.

This is a gothic horror dungeons and dragons experience, not a real life simulator you guys.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Gaul on August 09, 2013, 03:53:03 PM
Wow. Could you imagine the manpower that would be required to police something like that. And not only that, the giant linguistic nerd arguments about what languages are related to what. DM burnout would increase tenfold.

This is a gothic horror dungeons and dragons experience, not a real life simulator you guys.

The point of having a language scrambler is to -spare- having DM"s and players having to moderate and gauge the information they acquire as they roleplay.

The main ingredient of fun roleplaying is suspense.  When you know exactly what's going on, as it's going on, it's just a routine of killing things and showing off.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: queenofspades on August 09, 2013, 08:48:19 PM
I wasn't suggesting any kind of systems, but what I was saying is, that having say a gothic earth frenchman arrive, if he spent enough time in Demylooooooo it would be within reason that he could learn the language in a shorter time. Especially if he found a tutor, and like I said, I imagine common wouldn't be amasingly hard for any thorass-using gothic earth resident. its not like me, an English Speaking Australian, Trying to learn Cyrillic.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on August 10, 2013, 02:48:33 AM
I wasn't suggesting any kind of systems, but what I was saying is, that having say a gothic earth frenchman arrive, if he spent enough time in Demylooooooo it would be within reason that he could learn the language in a shorter time. Especially if he found a tutor, and like I said, I imagine common wouldn't be amasingly hard for any thorass-using gothic earth resident. its not like me, an English Speaking Australian, Trying to learn Cyrillic.
Yes, but in D&D it isn't any easier or more difficult to learn one language over another, you just spend a skill slot to learn it and that's it. Gothic Earth characters, being that they are cut off from the other D&D worlds, do not have Common and must simply spend a language skill slot to learn it.

Since we don't have a mechanical system in place, the ruling was this:

The important part is to avoid cheesing.

I believe the principle for languages is:

 :arrow: Starting languages = Common + one racial language + bonus languages (additional number of languages is equal to your starting Intelligence modifier. Make this one believable as it is rare for a level 2 to know Abyssal/Draconic/more obscure languages)
 :arrow: Capacity for learning additional languages = Intelligence modifier - already learned bonus languages

One should roleplay learning a language land make the process believable.
Ravenloft characters get their domain's primary language(s) for free as well.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Perkele on September 03, 2013, 01:31:53 PM
I'm curious if there's any analogy to the Sanguinian language? Or if it's at least inspired by anything? Or is it completely unknown?
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on September 03, 2013, 06:03:50 PM
Russian. Same for their neighbor Vorostokov.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Bluebomber4evr on September 03, 2013, 06:51:21 PM
I'm curious if there's any analogy to the Sanguinian language? Or if it's at least inspired by anything? Or is it completely unknown?
It never got that much detail as far as analogous languages go. It's vaguely eastern European, which really doesn't help much. The name of the domain is based on the Latin word for blood, and the darklord's name is Slavic.

As for inspiration, the darklord is based on both Prince Prospero from Edgar Allen Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death" and Count Orlock from the 1922 silent film Nosferatu.

Russian. Same for their neighbor Vorostokov.
Nope.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Geiger on September 03, 2013, 09:59:44 PM
I'm curious if there's any analogy to the Sanguinian language? Or if it's at least inspired by anything? Or is it completely unknown?
It never got that much detail as far as analogous languages go. It's vaguely eastern European, which really doesn't help much. The name of the domain is based on the Latin word for blood, and the darklord's name is Slavic.

As for inspiration, the darklord is based on both Prince Prospero from Edgar Allen Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death" and Count Orlock from the 1922 silent film Nosferatu.

Russian. Same for their neighbor Vorostokov.
Nope.

Yeah, you're right, I looked over the Campaign Setting 3rd edition and all the toponyms, and even Ladislav's surname are Romanian in origin. So if anything its another Generic Balkan/Slavic language.

Mount Radu, Lake Argus, Castle Guirgiu, Kosova, Tirgo, Fagarus. All Romanian type place-names.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: Perkele on September 04, 2013, 09:53:16 AM
Aha, I see.

Thank you for the answers.
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: MAB77 on March 16, 2014, 07:32:30 PM
For those interested in playing Lamordians and using a few real Plautdietsch words here and there, there is an interesting Plautdietsch Lexicon (Low German Dictionary) available at http://plautdietsch.22web.org/index-english/index.htm
Title: Re: Ravenloft Languages
Post by: herkles on February 18, 2015, 02:04:36 PM
does mordent use Middle english? as it is listed as Mordentish, and said they switch it up in their dialect?